Jul 28, 2014

Liturgical Ornament Crafts for this Week (July 28 - August 2)


I thought I'd try to get this weeks ornaments out together, so you can create them all at the same time if you like. Elizabeth and I made at least 4 more for next week Aug 3rd to the 9th. :-)
St. Martha

St. Ignatius of Loyola

St. Peter Julian Eymard



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St. Peter Julian Eymard Craft {Liturgical Ornament}


St. Peter Julian Eymard's feast day is Aug. 2 in the new calendar. He began his love of Jesus at a young age and became a priest at the age of 23. He had a devotion to the Blessed Sacrament and tried to spread that love to all those around him. He is the founder of the Servants of the Blessed Sacrament. Read more about him HERE, HERE, and HERE.
Because of his love of the Blessed Sacrament, Elizabeth and I made a monstrance for this ornament. We used yellow and white felt, as well as, gold pipe cleaners and a brown sharpie marker.
This is a double-sided ornament, so all the felt parts are doubled. 
We cut the gold pipe cleaner into short 1 inch strips - they are the rays of the monstrance. We used the yellow felt to make the stand part of the monstrance. We made the host from white felt and we the cross was added with a sharpie brown marker. 
We glued the small strips of gold pipe cleaner to the back of one of the yellow felt shapes. Then layered the second yellow shape on top. We glued on the hosts - one on both side. I recommend using hot glue to make this ornament. 

You may like to visit Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament on St. Peter Julian Eymard's feast day.
St. Peter Julian Eymard, pray for us.
~Jennifer


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St. Ignatius of Loyola Craft {Liturgical Ornament}

St. Ignatius of Loyola's feast day is July 31 (in the new and traditional calendars). St. Ignatius was a solder, but while he was recovering from a cannonball wound he began to read about Jesus and the saints. He soon devoted his life to Jesus. He, along with St. Francis Xavier and a few others, founded the Jesuits.  Read more about him HERE and HERE

Because IHS is often associated with St. Ignatius and the Jesuits, Elizabeth and I decided to make that the main point in our ornament. If you are wondering what IHS means, it's the name “Jesus” in Greek. Jesus is written ιησους in original Greek and is transliterated as “ihsous” and pronounced iēsous. 

This ornament was created with white and yellow felt. Red permanent marker was used to make the IHS and orange permanent marker was used to decorate the yellow rays. 

St. Ignatius, pray for us!
Have a blessed last day of July!
~Jennifer


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St. Martha Craft {Liturgical Ornament}

The feast of St. Martha is July 29th (new and traditional calendars). She was a friend of Jesus and the sister to Mary Magdalene and Lazarus. Because of the story in Luke 10:38-42, Elizabeth and I decided to go with a house keeping theme. So we created a broom. 
We used dark brown and yellow felt to create this ornament. We also used a brown permanent marker to add "bristles" to the broom. This ornament is double-sided so it looks the same on both sides. Although we don't have it pictured, we did make two broom handles and glued them back to back. This made the ornament more stable.  





St. Martha, pray for us!
God Bless.
~Jennifer

See all the liturgical ornaments HERE


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Jul 24, 2014

St. Anne and St. Joachim Craft {Liturgical Ornament}


Sts. Anne and Joachim are remembered and honored on July 26th in the new Catholic calender (Traditionally - July 26th for Anne and Aug. 16th for Joachim). While we don't know much about these two saints, we do know that they were blessed to the the parents of an amazing woman - Mary the Mother of God. How special was this couple that God allowed them to conceive a baby with no original sin!? Wow! What a blessing!
St. Anne and St. Joachim, were the first teachers of Our Blessed Mother, so my daughter, Elizabeth, and I decided to use a book for one of the symbols. Because Anne would have also taught Mary how to keep house, cook, and make clothes, we use a spool of thread as another symbol.

We used maroon, light blue, light brown and white felt to make this ornament.
 The book was make with a larger maroon rectangle shape which was folded in half. We added  three smaller, white, rectangle shapes inside the folded maroon rectangle to form the pages. It was all hot glued at the "binding". 
The spool was a light brown spool shape and a few small strips of light blue to make the "thread". The spool was glued onto the book.

The above picture has a better view of the spool of thread. 

Sts. Anne and Joachim, pray for us.
God bless you all.
~Jennifer & crafting buddy, Elizabeth :-) 



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Jul 23, 2014

St. Christopher Craft {Liturgical Ornament}


 St. Christopher was a very large and strong man. In his kindness he often would carry pilgrims (travelers on a religious journey) across a river. One day a child asked to be taken across. St. Christopher was happy to help. He placed the child on his shoulder and carried him across the river. The child became heavier and heavier, till the weight became almost too much to hold. Then he realized it was Christ - the Lord of the world- that he carried. (Christopher means "Christ-carrier"). Read more about St. Christopher - here
St. Christopher's ornament includes two symbols: one for St. Christopher and one for the Lord of the World. St. Christopher is represented with a travelers staff  and sack. Our Lord is represented in the image of the world with the triumphant cross. 
We used dark brown, off-white, light brown, and light blue felt to create this ornament. We used a light blue marker, a green marker, and a brown marker to make the world with the triumphant cross. Brown marker was used on the sack, too. All the parts were glued onto an off-white oval-ish shape so they could be hung on the liturgical tree. 

St. Christopher shared his feast day (July 25th) with St. James the Greater.
Click here to see the post about St. James the Greater.


St. Christopher, pray for us.
Have a blessed day!
~Jennifer



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St. James the Greater Craft {Liturgical Ornament}


St. James the Greater, who was one of the sons of Zebedee, is celebrated in high honor on July 25th (in the new and old calendars). He is, of course, one of Jesus' apostles and is attributed to being Jesus' first apostle. He is the brother to John (the "disciple whom Jesus loved") and is know as "the greater" - not because he was smarter or better but because he was larger then the other James (James the lesser).
He had a full life and brought many souls to Jesus. Read more about him here and here.

For his ornament, we used the  "Cross of St. James" image. This symbol is a mix between a cross and a sword. The cross is for Jesus, and a sword represents the instrument used to behead James at his martyrdom.
To create this, I first drew the "St. James Cross" on red sheet of felt. Then I cut it out and flipped it over. Elizabeth glued it onto a off-white oval with the drawn side down - because it was kind-of messy looking. Using a brown permanent marker, we lightly outlined the plan side of the cross to add a little bit of interest. Then, we added a threaded loop of silver thread.

Because July 25 is the feast day for two well known saints, Elizabeth and I created two ornaments for the day.  Click here to see St. Christopher's ornament.

St. James, pray for us.
~Jennifer


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Jul 22, 2014

St. Bridget of Sweden Craft {Liturgical Ornament}


We celebrate the feast of St. Bridget of Sweden on July 23. (Her traditional feast day is on Oct. 8th.) She married around the age of 14 and had 8 children. (Including St. Catherine of Sweden). St. Bridget was a visionary and after her husband died she worked hard trying to restore the Church. She is the founder of the Brigettine nuns, and the patron saint of Sweden, Europe, and widows.  The symbols on the ornament which we created for her includes a "pilgrim's" staff,  because she took MANY pilgrimages. The staff is accompanied by a book - another common symbol of her's. 
Read more about her HERE and HERE.

We used gray, dark brown, maroon, and white felt to create this ornament. We glued the staff onto a white oval for stability (we used hot glue). The book was created using a gray rectangle (the cover) and thee small white rectangles (the pages). It was all glued (hot glue) together at the book's "binding"; so it will partly open. Then the book was glued onto the oval with the staff. A silver threaded loop was added so it could be hung on our Liturgical tree.  

Note: St. Bridget of Sweden is also known as St. Brigit, St. Birgitta, or Birgitta of Vadstena.
She is commonly confused with St. Bridget of Ireland, whose feast day is Feb 1.

St. Bridget of Sweden, pray for us!
May you all have a blessed day!
~Jennifer

See all the Liturgical Ornaments HERE


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Jul 21, 2014

St. Mary Magdalene Craft {Liturgical Ornament}


St. Mary Magdalene's feast day is July 22 (New and Traditional calendars) The story from John 12:1-8 tells us how Mary Magdalene anointed the feet of Jesus with expensive perfume. So for her liturgical ornament Elizabeth and I decided to make a perfume bottle (an older style).
 
We used light blue felt, and a light blue permanent marker. We folded a 2x3 inch rectangular piece of light blue felt in half and cut half a perfume bottle shape from it so that it could be opened into a full bottle. Then we added a light blue marker outline and glass-glare. The shaded-outline really makes it "pop"! A silver threaded loop was added to hang it on our Liturgical Tree. 

If you missed the first posts about our ornament crafts -CLICK HERE 

St. Mary Magdalene, pray for us!
God bless.
~Jennifer


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Jul 15, 2014

Our Lady of Mount Carmel Craft {Liturgical Ornament}


Elizabeth is hoping to create ornaments at the speed of light! She twisted my arm (she's a strong girl -lol!) and begged me to help her make 5 this morning! Here is the ornament for Our Lady of Mount Carmel's Feast day, July 16 (for the new and traditional calendars). I'll post the others later when I have more time. 
For this ornament, we wanted to make the brown scapular the main focus, and we added a simple image of the Sacred and Immaculate Hearts. 

If you missed the first post about our ornament crafts -CLICK HERE 
That post also shows the first three ornaments, too!

To make it we used: dark brown felt, light brown felt, white felt, brown embroidery string, and hot glue. 
We used silver thread to add the string so we could hang it on our liturgical tree.
The hearts were added with permanent sharpie markers: yellow, orange, red, brown, and black. 

It turned out to be so cute! Well, I like miniatures so a tiny scapular is just my style! 

Our Lady of Mount Carmel, pray for us!
God bless you all!
~Jennifer

See more ideas to celebrate Our Lady of Mt. Carmel - HERE
See all the Liturgical Ornaments - HERE


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Jul 14, 2014

Liturgical Ornaments {Simple and Easy Mini Crafts}


Summer is in full swing and my 10 year old daughter, Elizabeth, has been complaining that she is "bored". Elizabeth is a very creative young lady, but it's her creativity that often feeds her feeling of boredom. If she doesn't have something creative to do she just looks lost and kind-of wonders around. So I decided to give her something to spark her creative juices.
I asked Elizabeth if she wanted to make little ornaments that centered around the liturgical year. We have a "tree" in our house which we decorate throughout the year. The changing decorations include: Saint MedalsMary flowersSt. Valentine Hearts, Catholic SnowflakesLenten Jesus TreeAssumption decorand more! I thought it would be nice if the kids had an ornament to hang on the tree after we talked about the saint of the day. I told Elizabeth that she could use the stuff in my craft box which is over flowing with chenille stems (A.K.A pipe cleaner), pom-poms, felt, sequins, beads, etc.! That was almost too exciting for her to handle! She couldn't wait to begin.
Each of the ornaments that she (and I - if she needs help) will create will have a liturgical centered meaning. Most will be symbols of saints. Here are the first three she and I made. I did help her with these first few. She seemed to need a little help getting her creativity going. Now that she has an idea of what I was asking for, I'm sure she'll be doing most of them on her own. But ether way it's a great mom and daughter bonding time! ;-)
St. Veronica
READ MORE about this ornament...


Sts. Benedict and Scholastica
Read more HERE


St. Kateri Tekakwitha

All the ornaments will be added to this page:


I'll post about our new ornaments as she/we make them.
I'm not sure how often she/we will make one of these ornaments, but I'm hoping for at least 2 a month or even one a week -but no pressure. You can't force creativity! It just has to happen on it's own. 
I'm hoping to get future ornaments posted *before* the saint's feast day, but life is a bit crazy sometimes. (I'm sure that will be especially true once school starts again.) I'll do my best to keep posting! 
God Bless.
~Jennifer

What do your bored kids do during summer break?


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St. Kateri Tekakwitha Craft {Liturgical Ornament}


St. Kateri Tekakwitha is a new saint who's feast day is July 14th. Elizabeth had a hard time coming up with a symbol for this beautiful saint. So I helped with the design. 
To create this ornament, we used dark brown felt, off-white felt, a black permanent sharpie marker, thread, small Indian beads, and glue. (We used hot glue, but high quality craft glue will work.) 
Two strips of brown felt formed a cross and two feather shapes with black marker detailing were the decoration on the cross. We glued all the parts together. Then, using thread, we made a few beaded dangles and threaded them onto the feathers.
To give the feathers more of a feather look we cut slits in the sides. Just don't cut all the way through! 
It's just a small tribute to such a wonderful saint!
St. Kateri, pray for us!

Till later,
~Jennifer

See all the other Liturgical Ornaments HERE.


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Sts. Benedict and Scholastica Craft {Liturgical Ornaments}


The second ornament Elizabeth and I made was for the feast of St. Benedict, whos feast day is celebrated on July 11 (in the NEW calendar). His traditional feast is March 21.  Scholastica's feast day is celebrated on Feb 10.  These two saints are twins, so we just kept them together. 
This ornament was made with maroon and off-white felt, black and brown permanent sharpie markers, half of a gold pipe cleaner, and a small plastic dove (optional). All the parts were glued together. Hot glue or a good quality craft glue will work. (I prefer the hot glue - it lasts longer and it's quicker.)
The book was decorated with the brown and black markers. Dots were all that was needed to make the "writing" on the book. Marker details add a lot! The dove was a nice touch, but not necessary. The dove is really the symbol for St. Scholastica - not so much St. Benedict. 

See all the other Liturgical ornaments HERE.
God Bless.
~Jennifer


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Do not be conformed to this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind, that you may discern what is the will of God, what is good and pleasing and perfect. ~Romans 12:2


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