Aug 21, 2014

Learning Catholic Words and Meanings {Vocabulary Notebook Pages}


One way I like to help my kids learn and retain knowledge of our faith is through Catholic picture dictionaries. Their simple design makes them easy to pick-up and read when you have only a few free minutes. To help them retain these words and meanings, I created a "Catholic Words" printable notebooking sheet.

This page has space for:
  1. the name of the Catholic word they are learning
  2. the definition (some definitions may need to be shortened)
  3. a picture of the idea/item, if possible
Each page has space for 3 words. 
My kids have these pages in a 3-ring binder and they add a word a day. They do this during the school day when they are finished all their other work and they are waiting on me to check/help them.
Each night I write a Catholic word onto our blackboard. Then, during school time the next day, they pull out their Catholic dictionary look up the word and write it down, along with the definition. They also draw a picture of the item or idea if they can.

These are the books we used to look up the Catholic words:
This book is the one my older kids use:

This one was better for the younger kids:


Has anyone ever use this book?
 I'm wondering if it's good:

Vocabulary Sheets

Along with the "Catholic Words" sheet I created a "vocabulary" sheet. This one is for everyday words. My kids use this one when they come across a word they don't know. They write it down and look it up.
The word area on this page has space for:
  1. the word
  2. the definition
  3. antonyms 
  4. synonyms
  5. a sentence 
  6. and they can draw a picture, if possible
These are also kept in the same 3-ring binder. They have a page with a tab between the two sections.

Both these pages and a cover page are available in our Member's area
Look under "Vocabulary" in the "School" section.
Click here to become a member or to login.

Enjoy!
Hope you have a blessed school year!
~Jennifer

See more school printables and other ideas HERE



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Aug 18, 2014

Sts. Helena, Rose, Monica, and Augustine + Queenship of Mary Crafts {Liturgical Ornaments}


Today, I'm posting all the ornaments that Elizabeth and I made for the remainder of August. I wanted to get them all out before my surgery since I'm not sure how I'll be feeling. (The surgery is on Aug 22 - I need to have my one remaining ovary removed - I'm 37 and too young for menopause, but I guess some things are God's will and out of our control.) Please, say a prayer for me. This is not a major surgery and if all goes well I should be home the same day, but I still hate going. I'm so nervous about the surgery and menopause! Well, it was nice posting these tonight. It gave me something else to think about!  Maybe my recovery will give me time to finally post all those other things I've been hoping to post! ;-)  There is always an up-side to things! 

Aug 18th (traditional)

Aug. 22 (new)

Aug 23 (new) & Aug 30 (traditional)

St. Monica ~ Aug. 27 (new) & May 4 (traditional)
St. Augustine ~ Aug. 28 (new & trad.)

Hope you all a have a blessed day!
And thank you for any prayers.
~Jennifer (and my crafting buddy, Elizabeth)


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Aug 17, 2014

St. Monica and St. Augustine Craft {Liturgical Ornament}


St. Monica and St. Augustine were mother and son, so we kept them together. St. Monica, the patron saint of mothers, prayed many, many years for the conversion of her wayward son. Finally, he converted and sang the praises of God to all those he met! At the age of 41 he became bishop of Hippo.  
Read more HERE and HERE. St. Monica's feast day is Aug. 27 (new) & May 4 (traditional)  St. Augustine's feast day is Aug. 28 (new & trad.)
I have to tell you we had a bit of a time deciding how to do this one. Of course we made a few jokes and said we should make a hippo wearing a bishop's miter, since Augustine was the bishop of Hippo, but in the end I think this was a MUCH better idea! St. Monica and St. Augustine are often pictured with a book, so we decided to make a book and add another symbol for each one of them. Because St. Monica is sometimes pictured with flowers we added a flower for her. St. Augustine is often show with a flaming heart which is pierced with an arrow so we added that for him. 
The book is made from maroon and white felt. We added the "print" with a black permanent sharpie marker. It's just simple dots lined up in rows. We also outlined the pages with a brown sharpie marker.  The flower was made by creating two purple flowers (one larger and one smaller) and a small pink circle. I used a purple marker to outline the flower parts. Augustine's heart is red and outlined with a purple marker - yes, purple. The flame is yellow and was outlined with an orange marker. The arrow is dark brown and was slid through a small slit in the heart. All the parts were hot glued together.

St. Monica and St. Augustine, Pray for us!
~Jennifer and Elizabeth

Visit our Etsy shop to purchase our St. Monica felt statue



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St. Rose of Lima Craft {Liturgical Ornament}


Catholic Cultures wed site had a beautiful description of St. Rose that says: "Rose of Lima, a member of the Third Order of St. Dominic, was the 'first blossom of sanctity that South America gave to the world.' Hers was a life heroic in virtue and penance... " Visit their site to read more about her. You can also visit Catholic.org to read more, too. St. Rose of Lima's feast day is Aug. 23 (new) and Aug. 30 (trad.).
Elizabeth and I were going to add roses to a wreath for St. Rose's ornament, but decided that it was a bit difficult to make all those little roses. So we made the flowers more simple. 
We cut out pink and purple flowers and arranged them on a green circle/wreath. We glued two strips of dark brown felt into a cross shape and then glued it onto the wreath. Next we added a few green leaves among the flowers.  To make it pop, we added a few drops of silver glitter glue and it turned out to be a sweet ornament to honor St. Rose of Lima.

St. Rose, oh beautiful saint so kind and loving, intercede for us. Ask Our Lord to grant us all that we need to enter into heaven. 
St. Rose of Lima, pray for us!
~Jennifer and Elizabeth

Visit our Etsy store to buy our St. Rose of Lima felt statue.


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Queenship of the Blessed Virgin Mary Craft {Liturgical Ornament}


For the Coronation of Mary (Aug. 22 -new calendar), Elizabeth wanted to make a sparkly crown with gems. 
While I'm sure this isn't even close to being as pretty as Mary's real crown, it is very sparkly!
To make this Elizabeth first made a crown shape from a gold pipe cleaner. We then glued it onto a scrap piece of yellow felt.  Then we cut out around the pipe cleaner so the yellow was only seen on the inside of the crown shape. 
Now for the fun part!! Elizabeth added glitter glue to the yellow felt. Then she used sequins and star sequins to make the gems on the crown. She also added a little bit of red glitter glue to the bottom!
She was very pleased with her sparkly crown!

♪ ♫ Hail Holy Queen enthroned above....

Have a blessed day!
~Jennifer and Elizabeth

You might like to see all our Coronation of Mary posts.
  CLICK HERE



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St. Helena or Helen Craft {Liturgical Ornament}

St. Helena (aka: St. Helen) is the Mother of Emperor Constantine and found the true cross of Christ. Her feast day is Aug. 18 (traditional calender). Read more about her HERE and HERE
Elizabeth and I got a little glitter glue happy with this one! The design is simple, but the glitter glue made it sing! :-o ♪ ♫ 
We made 7 rays from yellow felt and added a bit of orange permanent marker to them to make them look more interesting. We glued them onto a white oval which as a little bigger than the cross we had made from two strips of dark brown felt. 
We added silver glitter glue to the white area and gold glitter glue to the yellow area. We also added a bit of red glitter glue to the yellow area and three drops on the cross. 

St. Helena, pray for us!
~Jennifer and Elizabeth



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Aug 15, 2014

St. Roch or Rocco Craft {Liturgical Ornament)


 I never heard of  St. Rocco (aka: St. Roch) till a few years ago when my sister-in-law (May she rest in peace.) asked me to fix and repaint an old broken statue she found at a yard sale. She and I had no idea who the saint was, but after a bit of digging on the world-wide-web we discovered it was St. Rocco.
   I had to make an ornament for him, because I can't think of St. Rocco without thinking of my dearly departed sister-in-law. I hope and pray she finally got to meet St. Rocco in person! :-) 

St. Rocco, was known for his love of others and the way he helped those who where sick during the plague. He eventually became ill himself and secluded himself outside of town so he wouldn't be a burden on anyone. Legend says that a dog delivered bread to him each day till he was well again. 
Read more about him HERE and HERE.
His feast day is Aug. 16 - the anniversary of his death in prison.
St. Roch's ornament depicts a dog and a loaf of bread.
This was very easy to make and just too cute!
The dog is just three ovals: one larger light brown oval and two smaller dark brown ovals. The light brown oval has two smaller black dots for eyes and one larger black dot for the nose. These dots were made with a permanent sharpie marker.
The bread is an oval that was a little more flat on one of the long sides. We used a brown sharpie marker to add an edge all the way around and a few slashes in the top. These were glued onto a light blue background.


What a cute puppy! :-)
St. Rocco, pray for us!
Have a blessed weekend, everyone!
~Jennifer



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Aug 13, 2014

Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary Craft {Liturgical Ornament}


Making an ornament for the feast of the Blessed Mother's Assumption into Heaven (Aug 15) was an interesting task. So far we have not made people, just symbols, so we have taken a bit of a turn on this one. We kind-of made Jesus for the Transfiguration, but this one is more "real". Personally, I think it turned out to be very cute! 
I'll try to explain what we did: Elizabeth cut out all the little parts (except the hair, which I did) We have a body (a triangle with the top cut off) and two rectangle arms, which are cut from medium blue felt. We also have a head and hands, cut from tan felt. Mary's veil is light blue felt; one part is a half-oval for behind her head and the other is a "U" shape for in fount of her hair. Her hair is dark brown and it's a "U" shape with a hair-like look. There is also 3 puffy-looking clouds and a yellow halo (not pictured).
First, we glued the head to the body. Next we glued the arms to the back of the body so they look like Mary has them raised to Heaven. We added the hands to the arms - gluing them to the back of the arms. Then we added the behind-the-head part of the veil. Next, we added the hair and then the "U" shaped veil. Lay the "U" shaped veil over top the hair and try to cover only the outer edge of her hair. We tucked the ends of the "U" shaped veil behind Mary's arms and attached them behind Mary's dress. 
Now we glued the clouds together and glued Mary onto the clouds. We also added a yellow halo which had a been edged with an orange permanent marker. 
To make it even more special we added silver glitter glue to the cloud edges and gold glitter glue to her halo. 

Oh, Holy Mother, watch over your children here on Earth and keep us in your loving care. Guide us each day and grant us Grace so we may enter into Heaven with you.

God bless you all. 
~Jennifer and Elizabeth


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St. Maximilian Kolbe Craft {Liturgical Ornament}


St. Maximilian Kolbe! As my husband likes to say, "He's the man!!" Of course he says that about a lot of guy saints. :-) If you don't know about this wonderful saint who had a pure love of the Immaulata and gave his life for another man at a Nazi German death camp, then please read about him HERE and HERE.
His feast day is August 14.
St. Maximilian's ornament is a "piece" of his prison shirt.
Photo Credit
 Elizabeth and I cut out black felt strips and glued them onto a white square. We added a red triangle with a "P" drawn on it with a black sharpie marker. We also outlined the red triangle. We wrote St. Max's prisoner number - 16670 -  on an off-white rectangle. We also outlined it with a brown permanent marker and then glued it all on to the black and white striped square.

This ornament sure has sparked some conversations around our house! ;-)
St. Maximilian Mary Koble, Pray for us!
Till later,
~Jennifer and Elizabeth


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Aug 10, 2014

St. Jane Frances de Chantal Craft and Printable Book


Here is the first of this weeks ornaments. I wanted to put them all in one post again like I did the last few weeks, but my crafting helper, Elizabeth, left on a camping trip with her grandparents. So we haven't totally finished the rest of this weeks ornaments. When she comes back we will finish making the ones we have already started. In the meantime, here is the one we finished for St. Jane Frances de Chantal. 
St. Jane was an interesting woman, and I could tell you all about her, but instead I'm going to direct you to an ebook I created several years ago for my oldest girls when they were in the Little Flowers Girl's Club. This is a short printable book I wrote to teach all the girls in the club about her.
OR 
Just download the book from our free member's area
(Look under "St. Jane Frances" in the "Saints" section)
St. Jane's ornament has a set of crutches because she started a special order of Nuns  (The Visitation of Our Lady). The women in her order were sick, old, and/or crippled, and these nuns, although sick, old, and crippled, would care for those who were ill (mostly those who were sick from the plague). 
This ornament was made using light brown, dark brown, and black felt. 
We first cut out two long light brown triangles and then folded them in half to cut out the center parts of the crutches. We used dark brown to make the top of the crutches. We glued them onto the black felt (black because the nuns wore black) and we cut it into the shape of a heart. It's now hanging on our liturgical tree. 


Don't forget to download the ebook in our member's area
 or click here to read more about it.



God bless.
~Jennifer (and her crafting buddy, who will be home soon!)



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Do not be conformed to this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind, that you may discern what is the will of God, what is good and pleasing and perfect. ~Romans 12:2


Catholic Books for Kids:

 
 
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