Sep 17, 2014

St. Joseph of Cupertino Craft {Liturgical Ornament}


If you would have known Joseph of Cupertino as a boy, you never would have thought he would become a flying saint! He was neglected and unwanted by his mother, so he became very slow,  hot-tempered, and absent minded. As a young man he failed at all the jobs he was given. He was not accepted by the Franciscans, he was turned out by the Capuchins, and so he returned home. His mother was not happy to see him. She managed to get him into the Franciscan monastery as a servant.  During this time Joseph began to change. He began to learn humility, penance, and he worked hard. He was then accepted into the Franciscan order. He struggled with learning but eventually became a priest.
 After his priesthood, he began to perform miracles. He was seen over 70 times rising from the floor while he prayed or said Mass. Sometimes he "flew" very high. On one occasion he carried a huge cross through the air to a Calvary group, The cross was thirty-six feet high, but he carried it with ease! Talk about super hero power! :-) 
After word of his miracles spread, St. Joseph was often kept hidden. But people flocked to talk to him in confession. He converted many people before he died on Sept. 18 1663, at the age of 60.
His feast day is Sept. 18 in the Traditional Calendar.
Read more about him HERE.

Our ornament depicts St. Joseph flying through the air!! 
We used medium brown, peach/tan, yellow and white felt. We cut out the parts as pictured above. We used black permanent marker to make shadows on his robe - to look like he's flying.
Then we used brown and black permanent markers to make a face on the circle we cut out for his head. We also added orange to the yellow halo. 

St. Joseph is proof that there is hope for every human being!
We can all change and become true saints!

St. Joseph of Cupertino, pray for us!
God bless you all with joy!
~Jennifer and Elizabeth



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Sep 16, 2014

St. Robert Bellarmine Craft - Making a Biretta! {Liturgical Ornament}


St. Robert Bellarmine was born 3rd of 10 children. In 1560 he entered the Society of Jesus and after his ordination he began to teach at Louvain (1570-1576) where he became famous for his Latin sermons. In 1576, he was appointed to the chair of controversial theology at the Roman College, becoming Rector in 1592; he went on to become Provincial of Naples in 1594 and Cardinal in 1598. Continue reading about him HERE. It's a very interesting read! His Feast day is Sept. 17th in the new calendar and May 13th in the traditional calendar.

Because St. Robert is often pictured wearing his Cardinal's hat (AKA: biretta) we made a mini red biretta. I have to tell you we had a hard time coming up with an easy ornament for St. Robert! This ornament may be a bit difficult for some of you. If so, consider creating a mini solar system - He was part of the Galileo case. (Read more in the above link)
To create this ornament you will need red felt and hot glue. If you want to add the book you will also need maroon and white felt.
We started creating the biretta by making the above "shape" from red felt. It was a 1 inch by 4 inch piece of felt. It was sectioned into 4 parts. Each of the 4 parts had two bumps. The end bumps were more of a triangle shape.
Then we glued the ends together, so it was in a circle shape - like above.
Now we glued the bumps together in pairs. The bump on the one section was paired with a bump on the section beside it. DON'T glue the two triangle bumps together yet! 
So you should now have three paired bumps. The two triangle-shaped bumps should now be folded down to make that top portion flat. A biretta's top only has 3 bumps and one flat part. 
Now we added glue to the inside of the hat, to secure the bumped parts and the folded triangle shaped parts. We also added glue to the corners and pinched them together to make it more of a square shape.
If you want to add a book for the biretta to sit on, create one by gluing three smaller rectangles into a larger folded rectangle. Then glue the hat to the book.  Add a threaded loop to the center of the hat to hang it on the liturgical tree. 

Note: If you are having trouble understanding my instructions for the biretta, please watch the video below. His pattern in the video is a little different than mine, but it may help you make the above ornament. By the look of the video, I have a feeling paper birettas are easier to make than felt!
The video shows how to make a human-sized biretta.
You might like this for an All Saints day costume! There are many priest and bishop saints who wore a biretta. You might also like to make full-sized birettas for your kids to wear as you celebrate St. Robert's feast day!


Enjoy!
Have a blessed day as you celebrate St. Robert of Bellarmine!
~Jennifer and Elizabeth


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Sep 14, 2014

Our Lady of Sorrows Craft {Liturgical Ornament}


Our Lady of Sorrows is remembered on Sept 15th. This is the day we remember the 7 major sorrows which Our Lady would have experienced during her life. They are:
  1. The prophecy of Simeon (Luke 2:25-35)
  2. The flight into Egypt (Matthew 2:13-15)
  3. Loss of the Child Jesus for three days (Luke 2:41-50) 
  4. Mary meets Jesus on his way to Calvary (Luke 23:27-31; John 19:17)
  5. Crucifixion and Death of Jesus (John 19:25-30)
  6. The body of Jesus being taken from the Cross (Psalm 130; Luke 23:50-54; John 19:31-37)
  7. The burial of Jesus (Isaiah 53:8; Luke 23:50-56; John 19:38-42; Mark 15:40-47)
Read more about this feast day HERE.
Today I want to share the liturgical ornament which depicts the heart of Our Lady of Sorrows.
The heart was cut from red felt and lightly outlined with a purple permanent marker. The 7 swords were made from gray felt. The flames were cut from yellow felt and decorated with orange and red permanent markers. After everything was glued down, we also added gold glitter glue to the flames and red glitter glue to the heart where the swords "pierce" the heart and around the outer edge. Lastly, we added a gold-thread loop to hang it on our liturgical tree.

Our Lady pray for us, may we endure our struggles with grace and peace.

God bless you all!
~Jennifer and Elizabeth


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Sep 13, 2014

Exaltation of the Cross Craft {Liturgical Ornament}


The feast day of the Exaltation of the Cross reminds us that Jesus was victories over evil!
The cross is a sign of Jesus' victory! That doesn't mean we automatically will get to heaven; it means that Jesus has unlocked heaven's door. It's up to us to open the door. The only way we can do that is by showing God that we love Him. We need to give God our mind, soul, heart, and body. We need to do our every deed and action for Him! Each time we look at a cross or a crucifix we should remember that we need to give our lives to God because He gave His life for us so we would have the ability to enter heaven.

This ornament depicts a cross towering over the world!
It was created with tan, dark brown, and light blue felt. We used a green and blue permanent sharpie marker to draw the world on the light blue circle.
We added silver glitter glue to the cross and around the cross and earth. We also added gold glitter glue around the tan felt area. 

We added a threaded loop of gold thread and hung it on our liturgical tree!

We will be posting Our Lady of Sorrows tomorrow!

Hope you have a blessed day!
~Jennifer and Elizabeth


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Sep 10, 2014

ABC Cookie Dessert for the Holy Name Of Mary


For the feast of the Holy Name of Mary we made a simple sugar cookie dessert. We used our sugar cookie recipe and our M-A-R-Y cookie cutters to make a super yummy dessert!
 *See below if you don't have alphabet cutters.

To give our cookies a blue color we added blue sugar to the top of the cookies before we baked them.  Of course we realized too late that we didn't have any more blue decorating sugar. So we made some! Just place 3 or 4 tablespoons of granulated sugar into a zip-loc bag and then add a drop or two of blue food coloring. Zip up the bag and give it a good shake! If the sugar very wet you can spread it on out on wax paper to dry, but we just used our blue sugar as it was. 
The cookies came out of the oven with a blue glitter look! Perfect for Mary!
Once they were cool we used some whip cream from a spray can to make a long row of cream. Then we added the M-A-R-Y letters to the front of the row.
Here is Mary's name written in the clouds!!

*Don't have the letter cookie cutters? That's okay!
If you don't have alphabet cookie cutters, try making the letter by hand. Maybe roll out the dough and hand cut the letters with a knife. Or make the letters by creating long strains or ropes of rolled dough (my kids call them snakes) and form the long strains into the letter shapes.

It's a great activity for kids of all ages!
Super yummy and fun!

Have a blessed day!
~Jennifer

§∞ See more Holy Name of Mary ideas HERE.



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Sep 9, 2014

Most Holy Name of Mary Craft {Liturgical Ornament}


The feast of Mary's Holy Name is Sept. 12th.  There is great power behind Mary's name! Read about this devotion HERE
"Men do not fear a powerful hostile army as the powers of hell fear the name and protection of Mary." -Saint Bonaventure
Elizabeth and I were trying to make this ornament look kind-of heavenly. So we have two sparkly clouds and a sparkly sun. Plus, we have sparkles all over Mary's name which is written in the clouds. 
We used white felt with sparkles, yellow felt, and light blue felt. We cut out two cloud shapes from the sparkly white felt, a half circle from the yellow, and a rectangle which is big enough to fit the clouds and sun on.  We outlined the yellow with an orange permanent marker and we added gold glitter glue to it. We glued the two clouds together and used blue fabric paint to write Mary's name on the clouds. Once that dried we covered it with clear-sparkle fabric paint. After that was dry we glued all the parts onto the blue rectangle.
Next we added silver glitter glue around the edge of the clouds. And we added gold glitter glue around the sun. We also created rays coming from the sun. Once it was all dry we cut out around the clouds and sun.
These pictures don't do this justice. It's just full of sparkle!

Most Holy Mary, Queen above, Pray for us!
May every evil flea whenever we whisper the Holy Name of Mary!
God Bless.
~Jennifer and Elizabeth

You might also like:

We have lots of activities posted from the past few years. Click here to see more ideas.



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Sep 8, 2014

St. John Chrysostom Craft {Liturgical Ornament}


St. John was given the surname Chrysostomos,  meaning "golden-mouthed" because he was said to speak with eloquence. He is often considered the most prominent doctor of the Greek Church and known for his beautiful homilies. He was exiled after being falsely accused and later died in exile. Read more HERE and HERE.
 St. John Chrysostom wrote: "The bee is more honored than other animals, not because it labors, but because it labors for others". Bees, work unceasingly for the common good of the hive and obey without question their superiors, and above all their queen.... Finish reading on this idea HERE
His feast day is Sept. 13th in the new calendar and Jan. 27th in the traditional calendar. 
St. John was often pictured with a bee hive, because of his quote about the bees. So for his ornament, Elizabeth and I created a bee hive. 
We used light blue, green, light brown/tan yellow, and white felt. We also used a little purple to add a few tiny flowers. The bee was created with the yellow felt, and we added black stripes and a black head with a black permanent marker. We also used a brown permanent marker to outline the hive. We used a pink permanent marker to create the center of the flowers.
We glued the green "grass" to the light blue felt. We also added a few blades of grass before we added the hive. Then we added the bees and then the bee wings. Next we added a few flowers, just to make it look more cute! 

And now you have a cute little bee hive to add to your collection of saint ornaments!

St. John Chrysostom, pray for us. May we find peace in our hearts even when others treat us bad, like you did in your life.
God bless.
~Jennifer and Elizabeth

PS: I skipped Sept. 12th - The Most Holy Name of Mary, but we do have an ornament coming for her feast day... Maybe I can post it tomorrow. 



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Sep 7, 2014

St. Peter Claver Craft {Liturgical Ornament}


St. Peter Claver is known as the "Apostle of the Negroes".  St. Peter dedicated himself to the service of the Negro slaves for over thirty-three years. He was devoted to saving the souls of the African slaves and to abolishing the Negro slave trade.  Read more HERE. His feast day is Sept. 9th,  the day after Our Lady's Birthday.
The ornament for St. Peter Claver is two hands and a cross. The lighter colored hand is giving the cross to the darker colored hand. This is a symbol of St. Peter giving the Catholic faith to the African people who were forced into slavery. 
The ornament is made with white, peach/tan, medium brown and dark brown felt.
Cut out two hands: one medium brown and one preach/tan. Then cut out two strips from the dark brown felt to form the cross. Glue them onto the white felt square.
We used red, orange, and yellow permanent markers to add some color to the white felt.
This is now hanging on our liturgical tree.

St. Peter Claver, pray for us. May we understand each other and help each other grow closer to God even when we look and/or live differently.
God Bless.
~Jennifer and Elizabeth



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Sep 2, 2014

The Birth of Mary Craft {Liturgical Ornament}


For the birth of Our Lady (Sept. 8th), Elizabeth and I wanted to make a liturgical ornament that was filled with baby cuteness! So we made a pink baby and to confirm that this isn't just any baby girl, we added an Immaculate Heart.
This Immaculate Heart is a little different than the regular Immaculate Heart. We wanted this Immaculate Heart to look baby-like, so we made it pink! We also didn't add the sword, since Mary wouldn't have had any heart breaking experiences yet.
To create this ornament you will need:
  • Felt: pink, light blue, medium blue, yellow, and light brown/peach
  • Permanent markers: orange, pink, green, and red markers.
  • Glitter Glue: gold, silver, and a little red (optional) 
Cut out the parts as pictured above. Make Mary first and size everything based off of her. You could glue Mary's head on top of her blanket-body but it looks nicer if it's seen through a hole in the pink blanket.  We used pink and red permanent marker to shade the pink blanket that Mary is "wrapped" in. And we used orange marker on the edge of her halo. We also added gold glitter glue to make the halo sparkle. Glue it all together before you add the glitter or add the glitter to the halo and wait for the halo to dry before you glue everything together. (We used hot glue.)
After Baby Mary and all the other parts are glued down, cut out a pink heart and flame. Use the pink permanent sharpie marker to make flowers. Just make 5 or 6 dots in a circle shape and add a yellow dot in the middle area. Then add a few green marker leaves around them. We used a red marker around the edge of the heart. Cut out a yellow flame for the top of the heart. We added gold and red glitter glue to the flame and silver glitter glue around the heart. 
 Personally, I love this ornament! I think it's so cute! I hope you like it, too!

Mother Mary, Happy Birthday!!

God Bless,
~Jennifer and Elizabeth

You also might like the St. Gregory the Great Ornament.
His feast day is Sept. 3.

You also might like the Assumption Ornament

Click Here to see ALL the other Liturgical Ornaments!


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St. Gregory the Great Craft {Liturgical Ornament}


Saint Gregory the Great is the patron saint of teachers. He is one of the four great doctors of the Latin Church and his feast day is Sept. 3 on the new calendar (March 12 on the Traditional calendar). He built 7 monasteries and is know for his contributions to the Liturgy of the Mass and Office. He was also pope from the 3rd of September in 590 to his death on March 12th 604. Read more about him HERE.
The ornament for Gregory the Great consists of a book with a quill pen, a Papal Tiara with the three crowns, and the Holy Spirit. 
We made it with maroon, yellow, light brown, white and off-white felt. Plus, we used brown and black permanent markers on the book pages, as well as, the quill pen.  We used gold glitter glue on the yellow crowns (on the Papal Tiara) and we added a few drops of red glitter glue to add "gems".
Later we decided to add a Holy Spirit. (Ya, we make this all up as we go along! Just bear with me!) We glued all the parts onto the light brown felt and we added silver glitter glue around the Holy Spirit. 

St. Gregory the Great, pray for us - especially us mother who homeschool or those who are teachers! We have a big job and always need help!
God Bless,
~Jennifer


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About the Author:

Hi and welcome,
I'm Jennifer Marie Lawrence the author of this blog. I'm married to my best friend & we have 9 great kids (ages 15 to 3), who we home-educate in PA.

Here on "Catholic Inspired", I post about the faith and creative ways to share it at home and school. Most of these ideas come from our Catholic home, while other ideas are from around the web. { Read more...}


Do not be conformed to this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind, that you may discern what is the will of God, what is good and pleasing and perfect. ~Romans 12:2


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